Month: August 2019

Consider When Retouching A Photo

Avoid Relying On Tutorials

While you will learn a thing or two on how to retouch a photo by reading tutorials, you should avoid relying on them as the photo retouching tools change every now and then. The best way of going about it is ensuring that you fully understand a program before you work with it. This way you will be able to retouch a photo even if you don’t have the tutorial with you.

Be Cautious Of Curves

“Curves” is a very powerful tool in photo editing. If you are a beginner you should be very cautious of how use it. If you don’t have any experience with the tool you should consider turning the blend mode to luminosity in order to prevent the curve from impacting the color and skin tones.

Ensure the Eyes Are Sparkling

For the photo to have a perfect finish you should retouch the eyes and ensure that they are sparkling. One of the best tools to use in getting the sparkling eyes is the Eye Doctor actions. As rule of thumb you should avoid overusing the tool in order to prevent the eyes from looking fake.

These are tips on how to retouch a photo. When doing the retouch work always ensure that you sharpen the images so that all the necessary details are visible. Always remember that sharpening isn’t a one size fit all; therefore, you need to experiment with different tools until you get a perfect finish.

 

Great Tulip Photos

Consider Your Point of View

One of the characteristics that makes an image strong is when it presents a scene in a way that we don’t normally get to see it. As you walk through life each day, you see EVERYTHING, for the most part, at eye level. As beautiful as a Tulip may be, if you photograph it from your normal standing position, it will look like every other Tulip you have seen over the years. Beautiful?… yes, Unique or interesting?… probably not so much.

Look to present Tulips in a way they are not usually seen. When was the last time you got down on your belly on a nice day and gazed upward at the flowers? Maybe never, right? By gaining a different perspective than what you are used to seeing, the image now possesses the unique and interesting factor that makes it visually appealing.

Notice Your Backgrounds

If you happen upon a scene that contains a field of Tulips as far as the eye can see, or one where there’s a glorious mountain or sunset as the backdrop, well then you’re pretty much golden to start shooting away. However, for the other 99% of the time, you will be faced with less than glorious surroundings. This is when it is important to manage the scene. Even the most dazzling flowers will not be as appealing when you see parked cars, campers, stores, etc. behind them. Unless the background elements support your photograph, they should not be included.

There are several ways in which you can remove distractions from your background. One is by simply walking around your scene and finding a vantage point in which the less than desirable background elements are not visible. An example of this might be to shoot upward from a very low vantage point. By using the sky as the backdrop, you have avoided any existing distractions that may have been there. In addition to getting down low, you can attempt to photograph the flowers close up with a tight crop. Any items that may have been behind our floral subjects are nowhere to be seen and the focus of the image is on only the Tulips.

Use Depth of Field to Your Advantage

Depth of Field (or DOF), is basically the distance between the nearest and farthest elements in a photograph that appear sufficiently sharp in focus. When an image has a large depth of field, most elements in the scene from front to back will be in sharp focus. If an image has a shallow depth of field, the subject of the photograph will be sharp, while elements in front or behind it will be out of focus.

Controlling DOF can be a very powerful tool in creating strong images. Let’s go back to the previous tip, regarding backgrounds, for example. In addition to the strategies we discussed for removing distracting background elements, you could also use depth of field to your advantage. By throwing a background element out of focus, you will draw less attention to it.

Manipulating the depth of field can really assist in producing a strong and dynamic image. For example, with an out of focus foreground and background, you can keep the attention on a single Tulip just by keeping it sharply focused.

Controlling the depth of field is a technique that deserves its own article. In short, however, there are a few ways of achieving it. One of the most common ways is to use a large aperture (lower f-stop number) for shallow depth of field and a small aperture (higher f-stop number) for greater depth of field. This means you will have to get yourself out of the automatic setting and choose either manual mode or Aperture Priority mode on your camera.

Info of Wi-Fi Cameras

The cameras also make it easy for you to share photos on social networks. To share the photos you only need to connect the camera to your favorite social network such as twitter or Facebook.

If you want to upload the photos to your phone or computer, you can easily do so. The good side is that you don’t have to use a cable to connect the camera to your Smartphone or computer for you to upload the photos; you only need to find a hotspot and you will be able to upload the photos automatically.

In addition to this, you have wireless control over the camera’s setting through your mobile device. Here you need to put on the Wi-Fi function and you will be able to connect the camera and your mobile phone and as a result you will be able to control the camera’s settings.

Although, Wi-Fi cameras have the above benefits, they are being faced by a number of challenges. Some of the challenges include:

  • The system is hard to set up: unlike Smartphones that have large screens thus making them easy to set up, Wi-Fi cameras have small screens which make it hard to properly execute the various options. The small screens make it complicated to operate the devices.
  • Lack of dedicated apps: While some manufacturers make it easy for one to upload pictures to a social network or storage system, the corresponding apps are usually under-developed and often lack the necessary key features. The apps also tend to be too slow to accomplish the required task.
  • Compatibility: the unfortunate thing is that most of the present programs work only on particular operating systems. For the cameras to effectively work, the developers have to work on programs that will work across all platforms.
  • Price: the existing Wi-Fi cameras are more expensive than the regular cameras which often repel customers from buying them.

While the cameras face the above challenges, it’s easy to solve the challenges and create devices that anyone enthusiastic about technology will be eager to have.

GoPro Hero

Dive Housing

Rated for depths of up to one-hundred and ninety-seven feet, the GoPro hero accessory dive housing is a must have for anyone who wishes to get that perfect shot in any underwater situation. Protecting your camera is key, and this dive housing unit keeps your camera safe, and keeps your underwater pictures clear and focused.

WiFi Control

Now you can use your camera to take pictures anywhere, even when you are not behind it. This is one of those GoPro hero accessories you will wonder how you lived without, enabling you to use a simple control remote to take pictures, and connect to your computer without messy cords. You can even add the BacPac control system for even further Wi-Fi range.

LCD Screen

On or off your camera, the detachable LCD screen makes getting the perfect shot a breeze. Whether you are behind your camera or away from it, GoPro hero accessories don’t get better than this. Now you can see exactly what your picture could look like, before you even shoot it.

3D Picture

Now you can create your own 3D movie or picture, with this great accessory. By using two cameras, and taking footage simultaneously, you can build a 3D shot that will be the envy of every photographer. It even comes with its own 3D editing software, to make every facet of 3D footage as simple as any other picture.

Additional Batteries

You never know when, or for how long you are going to need your camera. That’s what makes these GoPro hero accessories so great! No you can be sure you have all of the battery life you will need, in a small, energy-efficient package. These rechargeable batteries last about two and a half hours of total recording time, so always be sure to pack extras.

About Vector Images

Advantages

The main advantages of this technique are as follows:

  • The ability to express data in the form that is easily comprehensible to human beings (e.g. standard SVGs );
  • The ability to express data in the format that uses very little space;
  • The ability to enlarge images in an arbitrary fashion, without distorting their resolution.

This technique of image description offers better data compression because vector images occupy lesser space in comparison to raster images. They are also easier to edit and manage. This is why, vector imaging technique is very useful in handling projects that require a lot of images of high definition. They can not only help in saving a lot of time, effort and space, but they can also save a lot of money. These days, many business organizations and professionals also opt for converting their regular images to vector images for saving space.

Image Quality

When a vector image is displayed on any device that has a higher resolution, it will not lose its definition. If a regular image is enlarged, the quality of the image will not be high and the pixels constituting each section of the image will be visible. If the same image was stored with the help of vector graphics, the lines constituting the image would be stored as equations that start from a certain point, and are identified with well defined initial and final coordinates.

When images described with vector graphics are enlarged, their view is not distorted and they do not appear pixilated. Instead, they appear very clear and take full advantage of the display potential of the device. The vector images are of very high quality and are available in the formats: DXF, DGN, DWG, HPGL, SVG, PDF, EMF and WMF. They are widely used in the fields of computer graphics, publishing, architecture, engineering and all other fields that require high definition images.

Exposure Value System

Briefly the smaller the f-stop number, the larger is the aperture size it represents. Each aperture setting is either half or twice the size of its neighbour (so f/8 – for example – is half the size of f/5.6, and f/5.6 is twice the size of f/8).

Similarly, shutter speed steps are also either half or twice as fast as its neighbour (so 1/30th – for example – is twice as long as 1/60th, and 1/60th is half as long as 1/30th).

Thusly, a number of different combinations of aperture size and shutter speed all produce the same degree of exposure. For example, f/5.6 at 1/60th provides the same level of light exposure as f/8 at 1/30th (where the amount of light halves, and the duration of exposure doubles).

Of course, there are even more permutations; f/8 at 1/30th is also the same as f/11 at 1/15th (half the light for twice as long), or f/4 at 1/125th (four times the light for a quarter of the time), and f/2.8 at 1/250th (eight times the light for an eighth of the time) etc.

A one step change, to either setting, is known as a “one stop” change.

To simplify the process of setting alternative aperture and shutter speed combinations, a German camera shutter manufacturer – called Friedrich Deckel – first developed the Exposure Value (EV) concept in the 1950s. The likely impetus for this was the rise in popularity of colour film, which required greater exposure accuracy than black and white film photography (modern 35mm colour film started to become available in the mid 1930s).

In 1954, numerous camera (and shutter) manufacturers adopted Deckel’s Exposure Value Scale (EVS); including Hasselblad, Kodak, Konica, Olympus, Ricoh, Seikosha and Voigtländer, to name but a few.

They introduced lenses with coupled shutters and, and EV scales, such that, after setting the exposure value, adjusting either the shutter speed or aperture made a corresponding adjustment in the other to maintain a constant exposure.

When camera models with built-in light meters started to emerge, some also metered against an EV scale (as opposed to an aperture or shutter speed scale), and correct exposure was accomplished by transferring the meter’s EV reading to the lens, though adjustment of lens apertures and/or shutter speed settings.

The Exposure Value (EV) is therefore a numerical scale that represents a combination of a camera’s shutter speeds and f-numbers, such that all combinations yield that the same exposure have the same EV value.

More than that, Exposure Value scale steps also align with intervals on the photographic exposure scale. In other words, an increment of one step on the EV scale represents a one step (often referred to as a stop) increase in exposure, and conversely a one step decrease corresponds to a one step reduction in exposure. For this reason, some cameras had, and still have, exposure compensation features that are graded as EV steps (e.g. +/- 2 EV).

For example, if EV 9 corresponds to f/4 and 1/30th of a second, EV 8 is f/4 at 1/15th of a second, and EV 10 is f/4 at 1/60th of a second (plus any other combination of settings that produce the EV scale value).

The EV scale starts at 0, which represents a 1 second exposure at f/1.0. Lenses with an aperture that big are rare, but it’s the same as a 2 second exposure at f/1.4, or a 4 second exposure at f/2, etc.

EV 15 equates to full sunlight with distinct shadows, while EV -4 would be a scene lit by a full moon. An EV is therefore a convenient “system” for describing the quality of light.

The EV scale can thus be used as a rough guide to exposure setting in the absence of a light meter. So EV 14 is hazy sunlight with soft shadows, EV 13 is cloudy bright with no shadows, 12 is overcast, and so on (for a 100 ISO film).

While the EV scale is still in use today (and has some merits in describing lighting conditions), it fell from favour as a means of setting a camera exposure towards the end of the 1960s, when meter coupling became more common, and removed the need to manually transfer a meter reading to lens settings, or even set anything at all (with the camera doing this automatically). In effect, the importance of correct colour exposure had been automated, leaving the way clear for casual photographers to concentrate on other aspects of the craft.