Compose A Great Photo

Rule Of Thirds

Compose your photo using the rule of thirds. Divide the picture area in to nine squares. Supposing you are taking a photograph of a landscape then the top one-third should be of the horizon and the bottom two-thirds should be of the scenery closer to you. You can also use this to compose the picture of a person by placing them in the central two squares and the back ground in the rest of the area of the picture. If it is a river or mountain in the background then place the person in the right or left bottom two squares of the composition while the river or mountain is placed on the side in the background.

Golden Triangle

When there are strong diagonal elements in the subject, divide the scenery into three triangles. A right-angled triangle occupies one half of the photo with the leading edge of the triangle running from one corner of the picture area to the other. The other half of the picture frame is divided into two right triangles by drawing a line from one corner to the diagonal. This draws attention to the strong elements in the bottom half where the two triangles are present. The other half is devoted to the background like a dark sky or a misty mountain.

Leading and Converging Lines

Here you take some lines like a road, a pathway edged on both sides by trees, a bridge leading towards the other end and composing a photo by drawing in the viewer’s eyes into the different elements that you want to highlight. Diverging lines distract the viewer away from the photo. So, take care when composing these photos.

The Fibonacci Spiral or Golden Spiral

Arranging the photographic elements in a Fibonacci spiral dramatically leads the viewers into the vortex of the picture. Take a spiral staircase or a whorl of a snail or a leaf delicately curled up and you get an idea of how this picture can be composed.