Category: Camera

Lens For Every Occasion

TELEPHOTO AND MACRO LENSES

Telephoto lenses are probably the most popular of all lenses. They are perfect for portrait and wildlife photography as they offer a closer view to your subject and in doing so, keeps distortion low. Faster lenses, with some type of stabilization are best, look for stats such as F2.8 or similar with IS or OS.

Macro Lenses, often used for focussing on finite detail in very small objects, are usually high quality lenses, and well manufactured. Find a lens with a fast maximum aperture of F2.0 or F2.8 if possible. You’ll pay more for it, but your ability to experiment with selective focus will be much greater.

TILT SHIFT LENSES

Tilt Shift lenses are high end and ideal for correcting camera perspective, caused by angling upwards or downwards, which results in a “leaning in or leaning … Read the rest

Collecting Classic Cameras

The first thing we budding photographers had to learn was a sequence of f-stops (aperture sizes) – f2.8, f4, f5.6, f8, f11, f16, etc – and that each was twice/half the size of its neighbour, with f2.8 being the largest, and f16 the smallest. Similarly, the shutter speeds were 30th, 60th, 125th, and 250th (on my camera anyway), and each was twice/half the speed of its neighbour. The final bit of information came with the film; a slip of paper that said something like this (for 100 ASA film):

1/125th and f/16 on a sunny day with distinct shadows
1/125th and f/11 on a slightly overcast day with soft shadows
1/125th and f/8 on an overcast day with shadows barely visible
1/125th and f/5.6 on a heavily overcast day with no shadows
1/125th and f/4 on in open shade or … Read the rest

Camera Aperture

Put quite simply your camera aperture is the opening in your camera’s lens that allows differential amounts of light through the lens to the cameras light sensitive sensor behind it. Together with the ISO value and shutter speed of your camera it controls the light exposure used to create your photograph.

The size of your camera aperture is controlled by settings called f/stops. An f/stop can also be likened to the human eye as the iris which controls the size of the eye’s pupil. Similarly the smaller the f/stop value (iris) the larger the camera aperture (pupil) and the more light that passes through the lens to the cameras sensor. The larger the f/stop value the smaller the aperture and the less light passes through..

Digital cameras will allow you to choose from an f/stop range dependent on your camera … Read the rest

Select Digital Camera for Wildlife Photography

It should give good image quality

This is one of the first requirements when it comes to buying camera for any purpose, isn’t it? However, the amount of focus on good image quality differs from person to person. For example, land photographers would want good image quality with a wide dynamic range to cover the finer details. On the other hand wildlife photography does not focuses more on the subject than the details present in the surroundings. Even higher ISO settings are useful in wildlife photography.

Auto Focus ability

This kind of photography is often about animals in motion. When in motion, animals rarely give the photographers any chance to adjust the focus of their camera prior to capturing the picture, isn’t it? In such situations, it is important to have a camera with good auto focus ability that helps … Read the rest

Features of the Canon EOS 70d

Touch screen

The touch screen on the EOS 70d makes light work of changing almost any setting using the Q menu. The touch screen menu is highly responsive and crystal clear to look at. It even includes an option to pinch-zoom pictures for better clarity when viewing the latest snapped images. Besides the onscreen controls, the menus are backed up with standard physical controls to take care of the basic shooting options if preferred. The touch screen is also design to flip out to one side to make easier viewing. This is especially helpful when working with video format.

Auto focus

A high-quality auto focus system is essential to take sharp pictures. The EOS 70d is installed with the latest Dual Pixel AF technology to make it easier to shot fast-moving objects. This DSLR auto focus system includes a total … Read the rest

Should Buy a Camera Strap

  • Stay hands free- A photographer subconsciously relies on this accessory usually to hold his treasured possession securely when they decide to stay hands off. Typically they are a substitute for the hands and allow you to perform other tasks even when there is no surface to rest the camera upon. For instance, on a shooting campaign in the muddy areas of a wildlife sanctuary, you probably would not let your camera struggle with the dust and scratches by making it sit on the dirty terrains. That’s where these accessories make a dramatic entry!
  • Safety- While letting the camera slip off your hands is a situation that often knocks a photographer’s door, these straps make sure that your equipment never falls off to the grounds and crashes into pieces. Of course after spending a fortune on your precious camera, you probably
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Guide To Tripods & Tripod Alternatives

For every situation where a tripod is needed, it is required in order to avoid introducing unwanted vibration into your camera, particularly during long exposure photographs, where the camera’s shutter will be open for a second or more, during which time any vibration will be picked up and, most likely, be represented as blurring of your subject(s) in your final image. Landscape photography is one such sub niche that always benefits from having a good quality tripod.

Another area of photography where you will want a tripod is if you’re exploring light painting – this time, not only are you going to be using longer exposure times, you’re also going to need to rest your camera on a stable platform, while you either stand off to one side with a flashlight, or go into the frame, painting light into your … Read the rest

Nikon D3400 Autofocus

There are a couple of occasions when you might want to use manual. If, for example, you are shooting video and you have somebody who is fairly static, then I would recommend that you first of all use autofocus to ensure that the subject is sharp, and then switch it over to manual. That is just to prevent the possibility of, when the subject moves in or out of the frame or in and out of focus, it stops the camera trying to track. The other time might be if I am shooting landscapes. Now, again, I might well use the cameras autofocus system in order to make sure that I have everything in focus and then switch it off. That is really just to ensure that whilst I am either setting up or composing or while I am actually … Read the rest